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Why Don’t Dolphins Fight Back?

August 23, 2013

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This has always been one of the most puzzling questions related to dolphin drive hunts, like Taiji, and the wild orca captures of the 1960s, 70s, and 80s (that are featured in Blackfish). Dolphins (and orcas are large dolphins) do not attack humans–even though they easily could–that are slaughtering them or taking their calves. It is hard to imagine almost any other species, reacting with the same passiveness or pacifism. Imagine trying to kill or take the cubs from a bear or a lion.

I’ve occasionally asked this question of dolphin experts like Lori Marino, but there is no obvious or satisfactory answer. Here, Laura Bridgman takes a shot and digs into the science that might suggest some answers to this profoundly complex question:

Our brains share many structural similarities with dolphins. For example, we both have a limbic system, which is responsible for handling emotional information. One difference between us, however, is that the dolphins’ limbic system is much larger than ours and, says scientist Denise Herzing, it “may be stretched out over more of the brain,” indicating that “the dolphin brain may have more of a ‘global connection’ to [emotional] information”. This could mean that dolphins are more emotional than humans, and that emotions could figure more prominently throughout their thought processes.

While it might be tempting to think that increased emotions would lead to greater aggression when being backed into a corner, another compelling feature of the dolphin brain appears to account for this notion. Sterling Bunnell, in The Evolution of Cetacean Intelligence points out that the cerebral cortex, responsible for logical thought and reasoning in both humans and dolphins alike, is controlled by the emotional activity of the limbic system. This process is facilitated by what are called ‘neocortical association neurons’.

Bunnell observed that, in human studies, the ratio of these neurons to limbic-system brain stem neurons “is necessary for such qualities as …emotional self-control” and that a decreased ratio is associated with “impulsiveness, emotional instability, irritability, loss of humor”. Bunnell points out that dolphins possess a higher neocortical-limbic ratio than the average human, suggesting that their control over their own emotions is greater than what we experience.

It could be that dolphins, while being more emotional, are more emotionally stable than we are, and are therefore able to better control themselves in stressful situations. This could explain their apparent control over the impulse to lash out at the humans who are so callously ending their lives.

This is an interesting hypothesis, but it makes me wonder what the evolutionary advantage or benefit of controlling emotions might be when experiencing an existential threat. In other words, in these situations it would be to the dolphins advantage NOT to control emotion and remain passive.

Whatever the answer, I suspect that if and when we do come to understand why dolphins behave with such pacificism when under attack by humans the answer will humble us.

8 Comments leave one →
  1. August 25, 2013 5:42 am

    I have nominated your blog for the Versatile Blogger Award.

    More about this nomination is at

  2. August 25, 2013 10:38 am

    I hope we do not come to understand this before we cease all dolphin slaughter!

  3. Ali permalink
    August 25, 2013 11:39 am

    It’s curious though….they seem to protect their calves and even us from sharks at times. It begs the questions…why are we exempt from their retaliation?

  4. Ilmarinen Vogel, Riverkeeper permalink
    August 25, 2013 1:47 pm

    Surviving mountaineers have established, that those, who try to fight the predicament have a better chance to perish, than those who keep their emotions under control, and begin by accepting the present before rushing away from it. In nature that works the same way. The difference with people, in my opinion is, that humans are disconnected from nature enough, to believe, that betrayal is an option. To our ocean dwellers, this is not the case. It has been known that people were saved by dolphins or whales, pushing them up to the surface. The betrayal of slaughter is not in their creative immagination, therefore leaving them stunned.
    The only thing is to submit to the adversity and to conserve energy by holding still. Or even to freeze, the way a gazelle will freeze if caught by a lion. Oh jes, betrayal is having us all
    frozen and playing dead. Look at Fukoschima. Did you get radiant fish yet in a grocery near you? Look at gmos. Look at the pharma industry trying to overthrow peoples rights, Look at the pacific trade agreements in the USA and in Canada with China. Out goes the Constitution, out goes the law of the land. The population of these two great nations ? Frozen. The betrayal is too great to fathom. How is that different from marine mammals being slaughtered ? We have some holding up of our own to do, with our children. They are the ones inheriting what we have cooked.

  5. ytyt permalink
    January 29, 2014 5:28 am

    when a bear starts chasing you, you have to fall on the ground and play dead…this is what many people have done…this is emotion control in my opinion…will dolphins play dead when an orca comes to eat them?

  6. ytyt permalink
    January 29, 2014 5:30 am

    if you look on wikipedia you will see how many neurons humans and dolphins have..


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